About the Podcast

Pastor Guy Giordano shares how he created a large garden in a prison to fight hunger in his community. Thousands of pounds of produce was grown each year supporting local food pantries and other nonprofits. More than just food flourished in the garden. The prisoners did too. The men gained a sense of hope, dignity and a sense of responsibility.

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Name:

Guy Giordano

Supplemental Material:

His #1 tip to improve access to healthy food:

The therapeutic garden gives the men living in prison hope, dignity, and a sense of responsibility.

About Guy Giordano:

Guy is the Senior Pastor at the Slocum Chapel in Exeter, Pennsylvania and has served in his prison ministry for 36 years at the local, state and county levels. In August of 2001, Guy joined the Jubilee Ministry team, located in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, an aftercare program supporting prisoners after they complete their sentence. His work has helped incarcerated men grow physically, spiritually, and emotionally through the work of the Lord. In 2016, Guy relocated to another smaller, special needs institution where he created a therapeutic garden right along the side of the chapel, which supports local food pantries with fresh organic vegetables.

Discussion Takeaways:

  • The garden promotes self-esteem and the gift to giving back to the community from within the prison walls.
  • There are good ideas and “God Ideas”. For Guy, the ladder is how the therapeutic prison garden came into the picture.
  • Prisoners had very few gardening tools and did everything by hand.
  • Prisoners worked 8 hours a day, even though they were scheduled to work 4 hours a day.
  • As the garden manager, Pastor Guy treated every prisoner like a normal person.
  • The garden gave everyone hope that, even though society had rejected the prisoners, these men were still loved by someone and by God.
  • Even if half the 96,000 people who are locked up in Pennsylvania got involved in a growing program, think of the number of people that could be fed.

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